Tag Archives: Boston

Granary Burying Ground: Back in colonial days people really knew how to die!


Last week my in-laws came up to visit the grandkids (and Wendy and me, too). One of the places we visited was the Granary Burying Ground.

Now, I don’t mean to brag, but I know burying grounds.  My dad’s a preacher and when you grow up living near churches you grow up living near burying grounds.  In fact, we even used a fancy, specialized word for them (“cemetery”) because “burying ground” just sounds primitive.  I used to take my dog, Sandy, for walks through the cemetery behind one of my dad’s churches, but then somebody called my dad to complain that walking dogs in graveyards was disrespectful and that ended that.  Continue reading Granary Burying Ground: Back in colonial days people really knew how to die!


Cool stats about public transit use in American cities

Apparently, Boston ranks 3rd (behind New York and Washington) among American cities with the smallest percentage of people commuting to work by car – and a particularly large proportion of people who walk.  Much more info and brightly colored graphs after the link.

Three cheers for biking, walking, and transiting!

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2013/10/us-cities-where-fewest-commuters-get-work-car/7390/

Link to this weekend’s edition of The Boston Calendar

If you have an interest in doing things in Boston, you need to check out The Boston Calendar.

What’s that?  You aren’t sure whether you really should?  Well, read the script for this infomercial and you’ll quit that foolish doubting:

Actor: [A pudgy guy who is clearly rooting for the Red Sox based on his luxurious, permanent playoff beard, is sitting in front of the TV flipping through the channels with a bored, slack-jawed, drooly-type expression on his face.]

Continue reading Link to this weekend’s edition of The Boston Calendar

The perils and glories of being a stay-at-home-dad

THE PERILS

Last week, I cut through the park in our neighborhood while I was walking home from some errand or another and saw a group of about 10 or 12 women enjoying a picnic with their kids.  The kids had all finished eating and were playing while the moms chatted and laughed. (Don’t judge, working folks, you do the same thing around the water cooler, but you rarely have to interrupt your discussion about the Breaking Bad series finale in order to clean up poop.)

I have to admit that I felt a pang of jealousy when I saw them – for the socialization, not the poop cleaning.  The kind of camaraderie I saw at the park or that I had with my colleagues in the professional world is rarely available for dads who serve as their family’s primary caregiver. Continue reading The perils and glories of being a stay-at-home-dad

What makes a city’s public art any good?

Here’s a link to fantastic article, titled Moving Beyond the Bronze Age, about public art in today’s Boston Globe.  The author, art critic Sebastian Smee, describes the bulk of Boston’s public art as rather monochromatic and risk-averse.  The public art is one of the things I’ve really enjoyed about living in Boston – it seems you can’t walk two blocks in any direction without running across a sculpture or mural or mosaic.  That said, I see his point. Continue reading What makes a city’s public art any good?

Skyline from Boston Harbor

View of the Boston Skyline from the Harbor
Panoramic View of the Boston Skyline from the Harbor

The kids started school a couple of weeks ago and in the chaos of adjusting to a new schedule I’ve neglected my duties here on the blog.  I’m sorry.  No.  Really.  I’m so sorry.  I hope you can find it in your heart to forgive me.  In the meantime, please accept this offering of a panoramic view of the Boston skyline from the harbor.  It’s a very pretty picture.  You can click on  it to see a larger version.