Tag Archives: family

Good Quote for February 6, 2014


“A family is a unit composed not only of children but of men, women, an occasional animal, and the common cold.” 

― Ogden Nash

Common colds are like a member of the family. Yep. A really irritating member of the family.

 

via Goodreads


Having Traditions vs. Being Traditional

Ah, Thanksgiving.  Family.  Food.  Football.  Five day weekend.  It’s almost upon us.  Actually, if I’m being honest, I’ll admit that it was never my favorite holiday as a kid.  No offense to those that love it.  It just never was my own personal favorite.  What does it have that regular days don’t?  Let’s go through the list, shall we? Continue reading Having Traditions vs. Being Traditional

The perils and glories of being a stay-at-home-dad

THE PERILS

Last week, I cut through the park in our neighborhood while I was walking home from some errand or another and saw a group of about 10 or 12 women enjoying a picnic with their kids.  The kids had all finished eating and were playing while the moms chatted and laughed. (Don’t judge, working folks, you do the same thing around the water cooler, but you rarely have to interrupt your discussion about the Breaking Bad series finale in order to clean up poop.)

I have to admit that I felt a pang of jealousy when I saw them – for the socialization, not the poop cleaning.  The kind of camaraderie I saw at the park or that I had with my colleagues in the professional world is rarely available for dads who serve as their family’s primary caregiver. Continue reading The perils and glories of being a stay-at-home-dad

Baby Bongo Born at the Franklin Park Zoo!

A baby Eastern Mountain Bongo named Mdogo (click the link for pictures and the story from Buzzfeed) was born at the Franklin Park Zoo on August 21, 2013!  These Bongos are a critically endangered species of antelope in central Kenya.

A Western Lowland Bongo Photo by Greg Hume
A Western Lowland Bongo
Photo by Greg Hume

Of course, as beautiful as they are, they’re not as popular as the lions and tigers, but Mdogo’s birth is important because bongos are part of the Species Survival Plan set up by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.  It is thought that only about 100 Eastern Mountain Bongos survive in the wild.  As cool as it is to see rabbits hopping around at the park or coyotes wandering through town, it’s even more incredible to be able to take the family to the zoo to see animals that may soon be extinct in the wild – especially if it helps kids to understand how important it is to take an interest in conservation that could ultimately prevent that extinction from ever happening!

And just since they’re so darn cute, here’s a link to a video of a baby bongo frolicking at the Melbourne Zoo.

Thai Curry: Cooking with Kids from Start to Finish

I really love Thai curries with all their sweet/spicy, coconutty, vaguely fishy splendor.  I didn’t grow up eating Thai food though.  Like many confused, young college students, I went through an experimental phase.  My experimentation involved revisiting the foods I’d tasted and turned down as a kid as well as the foods I never would’ve even given a chance.

My quest to expand my palate led me to a table at the only Thai restaurant that existed in Jackson, Mississippi at the time. Continue reading Thai Curry: Cooking with Kids from Start to Finish

Family Identity – Finding the Words

Identity + Blank Slate = ?
Identity + Blank Slate = ?

Once we knew what our general goals were with this project, we had to begin working towards them.  But because we’d agreed that we wanted to create our statement ourselves, we had to decide how to go about doing that…

Step 1: Explain the idea to the kids. We began by telling the kids we were thinking about what it means to be a member of our family.  I explained that, in our house, it means that we’re all related, of course, but that it also means that we share some similarities and that we use our differences to work together like a team.  Then I let it simmer on low. Continue reading Family Identity – Finding the Words